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What do people think of AI mastering like Izotope?

DARK Sounds

Administrator
Staff member
Jury's out mate, we use it, or used it.. Kind of started to enjoy doing it without the AI.. Loads more fun, steep learning curve but I feel a better connection to the music - if you get what I mean?
 
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Mindspawn

Tier 3 Contributor
Producer / Artist
Use AI if your aim is to sound like everyone else and you're not deeply concerned with "every little detail." That's what AI does, at least at present. It can also be a decent tool to learn with, used in a "here's a possible starting point" kind of way.

That said, you'll learn mastering faster by not using AI, IMO. You first want to learn what, if anything, needs to be adjusted. Then you'll learn "why" you do something instead of just adding things. Those things are hard to learn from AI. You'll probably learn faster by listening to a lot of great sounding music, and then doing some deliberate practice. Find a mentor to help point you in the right direction, then find some mixes you can work on... Maybe just start with Limiting... learn the various ways limiters affect the sound, then maybe move to EQs, and just use one plugin of each type... One limiter, like the L2 from FabFilter, or Tokyo Dawn's L6... learn them inside and out, do some null tests to help you really hear what the limiter adds... stuff like that will give you a great foundation.

While I prefer my nice basket of tools, I know without a doubt if I ONLY had FabFilter's L2 and Q3 (or Izotope's Ozone), I could still do the majority of the mastering tasks I generally need to do. Izotope's Ozone package can do the same, but use it deliberately, engaging one piece at a time, instead of using the AI or Master Assistant. It's actually a pretty phenomenal package, some very deep bits, some nice color and saturation stuff, great EQs, I often use the Vintage Limiter by itself to add a bit of limiting with a little color, the tape sim that's in Ozone is also another bit that gets some use from me... I used to use Ozone a lot more, and I still stay up to date with it, but over the last 5 or 6 years I've been exploring more software plugs that I've found I like better for my particular workflow and sonic preferences...

So, "yes" to Ozone, or some similar group of plugins and "not really" to using the AI side... your mileage may vary...
 
Comment

Modern Music for Funerals

Administrator
Producer / Artist
Use AI if your aim is to sound like everyone else and you're not deeply concerned with "every little detail." That's what AI does, at least at present. It can also be a decent tool to learn with, used in a "here's a possible starting point" kind of way.

That said, you'll learn mastering faster by not using AI, IMO. You first want to learn what, if anything, needs to be adjusted. Then you'll learn "why" you do something instead of just adding things. Those things are hard to learn from AI. You'll probably learn faster by listening to a lot of great sounding music, and then doing some deliberate practice. Find a mentor to help point you in the right direction, then find some mixes you can work on... Maybe just start with Limiting... learn the various ways limiters affect the sound, then maybe move to EQs, and just use one plugin of each type... One limiter, like the L2 from FabFilter, or Tokyo Dawn's L6... learn them inside and out, do some null tests to help you really hear what the limiter adds... stuff like that will give you a great foundation.

While I prefer my nice basket of tools, I know without a doubt if I ONLY had FabFilter's L2 and Q3 (or Izotope's Ozone), I could still do the majority of the mastering tasks I generally need to do. Izotope's Ozone package can do the same, but use it deliberately, engaging one piece at a time, instead of using the AI or Master Assistant. It's actually a pretty phenomenal package, some very deep bits, some nice color and saturation stuff, great EQs, I often use the Vintage Limiter by itself to add a bit of limiting with a little color, the tape sim that's in Ozone is also another bit that gets some use from me... I used to use Ozone a lot more, and I still stay up to date with it, but over the last 5 or 6 years I've been exploring more software plugs that I've found I like better for my particular workflow and sonic preferences...

So, "yes" to Ozone, or some similar group of plugins and "not really" to using the AI side... your mileage may vary...
What he said! + 1
 
Comment

Lethave Plank

Tier 2 Established
Producer / Artist
Tenebris Membrum
Today's mastering tools are incredible. But it's important to know how to use them, if only to know what sound we are looking for.
And this is important because so much of a musician's authenticity starts with the character of their own sound.
A good master is achieved from a good mix. Less is more.
 
Comment

Mindspawn

Tier 3 Contributor
Producer / Artist
Today's mastering tools are incredible. But it's important to know how to use them, if only to know what sound we are looking for.
And this is important because so much of a musician's authenticity starts with the character of their own sound.
A good master is achieved from a good mix. Less is more.
Serious truth. Whether you're using all hardware, all software, or a hybrid setup, don't simply pile processors into your mastering chain.... If it's in your chain, there should be a detailed reason why it's there. The more intimately familiar you are with a piece of kit, the more you'll know when and how to use it... Sometimes you need surgical and transparent, sometimes you want broad and colorful, sometimes you wanna get dirty... but not too dirty, sometimes you just need the "fairy dust" processor, sometimes (hopefully it's rare) you need a hammer.
 
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Laxa

Tier 2 Established
Producer / Artist
Tenebris Membrum
I think there's a learning curve. At first I hated Landr it seemed just to blow everything up but as I got more savvy things sound a lot better and I think it would take a purist to spot the difference between a pro track and an AI one. Also as I have put out 90 tracks since July the pro isn't really an affordable option. I have a mastering suit in my DAW but haven't been as satisfied with it as I have with Landr. I think it's a bit like those DNA site, the more responses they get the better they get.
 
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